Transitioning, Winter into Spring

Transitioning, Winter into Spring.

With the clock brought forward I think it might be safe to say it’s officially Spring unless if we get a surprise snow fall like last week.  AnyhoO positive thinking only, I’m here to show you how you can shift your cozy Winter looks into wearable Spring trends.

Now let’s face it although it’s officially Spring the air is still quite chilled so put aside your double breast coats  and opt for a wrap around wool coat. It’s lighter in weight, keeps you warm when there’s a chill and looks great opened up with a T-shirt or blouse teamed with Jeans or Khakis.

I love wearing lighter tones in the warmer months so when I spotted this lovely 1960s checked coat in my local vintage shop, it was love at first sight. I teamed this coat with an oversized acrylic neck piece from Marks and Spencers, a chocolate brown vest top and a caramel bootcut and black patent shoes. A casual smart look to combat the chills and welcome in the warmth.

Scroll down and check it out!

1 Neck piece – Old Marks & Spencer – similar 

2 Vest top – Marks & Spencer – similar 

3 Trousers – H&M – similar

4 Coat – similar

5 Shoes – similar

 

Thank you for stopping by, don’t leave without saying hello.

Rx

My Balkan Adventure – Montenegro

 

My Balkan Adventure – Montenegro (Day 3)

 Day 1 – Dubrovnik Croatia

 Day 2 – Bosnia&Herzegovina 

 

By day 3 the early morning rises had taken its toll on us and as the alarm went off for the 2nd time at 5:45am we wondered who’s brilliant idea it was to visit Montenegro. Nevertheless we were up and ready by 7am for our tour with Viator.  We started off from Dubrovnik, Croatia along the coastline been guided by the same tour guide we had for Bosnia. The drive from Dubrovnik into Montenegro shows the beautiful coastline as it gradually and dramatically changes. Almost as a reward for the long trip the scenery opened up into a grand mountainous sight with the town Perast nestled in the middle.

 

 

Perast

Perast has only one main street, its a tiny town with 16 churches, and 17 grand palazzos a reflection of its Venetian past. Many of these buildings are now ruins and some are being renovated. Perast has an air of ‘posh’ waterfront town, yet with the friendliness and familiarity of a fishing village. There are a clutter of uniformed stone buildings stacked on the foothill of Mount St. Elijah with sea view cafes looking out onto piers with small fishing boats floating on crystal clear waters. However the main attraction in Perast is not even on land, they’re two picturesque slightly surreal islands in the middle of the bay. One of the island is a monastery with tall evergreens surrounding it and the other is man-made with a Catholic Church with a perculiar history. The story is that in 1452 an icon of the Virgin Mary was found by two fishermen on a reef that above water. Over the centuries, people visited that reef and dropped stones into the water where the icon had appeared. The popularity of this ritual grew to the point that ships were loaded with rocks and sunk into the sea on the very spot. All of those stones, rocks and ships created an the island. After about 45 minutes at Perast we drove about 30 minutes further and came to Kotor.

 

Kotor – City Walls

The city walls of Kotor dates back to medieval times. It was started in 9th century to protect Kotor from invaders, and was added to by whoever ran the city at the time. From the Byzantines to the Venetians, until the 15th century when they finally formed a full loop up into the hillside. The maze like medieval town is well preserved, in the daytime the churches, museums, the squares and Venetian palaces appear greyish – green colour of the mountains it can be hard to pick them out. Making it very easy to get lost as they sometimes appear the same. We started our walk from the Kotor’s North Gate and followed the cobbled steps up. The further up we went the path became narrower and very difficult to walk, however the views were spectacular. We were told there are 1400ish steps and the fortress at the top was 1200 metres and with the glare of the sun and 30 minutes to spare before we meet our tour guide we decided to stop where we were, take photographs and make our way down. If you’re going to do the city walls in Montenegro it’s essential that you have the correct footwear, preferably hiking shoes or trainers (sneakers) with a grip. The cobbled ground is very very slippery and dangerous to walk on.

 

Views of the bay of Kotor from half way from the city walls

 

Eat

Konoba Potun   Great seafood menu – locally sourced

Tanjga –  Grilled meat and vegetables (similar to Čevapčiči)

 

 

Thank you for stopping by, don’t leave without saying hello… Share some stories of your travels any similarities to mine? Look forward to hearing from you.

 

Rx

 

 

 

 

 

My Balkan Adventure – Bosnia & Herzegovina

My Balkan Adventure – Bosnia & Herzegovina (Day 2)

 Day 1: Dubrovnik, Croatia

 Day 3: Montenegro

You can never be too organised on a short break the key is to maximise the time, so it’s always best to book activities before getting on the plane to your destination. On this trip, we booked with Viator back in London so on the day of our tour of Bosnia & Herzegovina, all we had to do was to be ready at 7:00 am and wait for the tour bus to pick us from the hotel. The guide that Viator provided was very knowledgeable in the history of Croatia and Bosnia. The tour took us through the countryside and the beautiful coast line of Croatia and then onto Bosnia & Herzegovina. Our first stop was Mostar

 

 

Mostar

I’m not sure if it was the cobbled streets with little alley ways and tiny houses or peharps the mini Mostar bridge, and pines trees in the distance which created a lovely backdrop to the vendors lining the streets, but I felt like I was on the set of ‘Lord of the Rings’ or a ‘Hobbit’ movie. It was soO pretty and I could’ve stood around longer staring into a distance, imagining little fairies and hobbits if it wasn’t so hot. Mostar can get as hot as 50 degrees and it was 42 that day!! The sun felt like it was biting my skin.

 

 

Naturally, we stopped at Mostar bridge, the iconic arch bridge which has been standing strong since it was built in 1556. (447 years) It was unfortunately destroyed in 1993 during the war.  Even though this bridge is a reconstruction of the original, UNESCO explains well: “The reconstructed Old Bridge and Old City of Mostar are symbols of reconciliation, international cooperation and the coexistence of diverse cultural, ethnic and religious communities”

Nowadays the Mostar bridge is known for the famous diving competition the Red Bull Cliff Diving World Series and if you hang around long enough you can watch the locals dive into the Neretva river below. It is common for the young men in the town to gather It is common for the young men in the town to gather donations from the tourists crowding around to watch, and then will jump once they feel they have raised enough money.  Since the water below is so cold, they will come down to the shore first to take a dip in the water and get their body used to it before jumping. Those who jump are skilled in diving (the water is only 3 meters deep and it is certainly not a feat for anyone to attempt!

 

Eat

Europa –

When it comes to food in Mostar, most of the restaurants have the same or similar traditional food since the locals cook and eat at home and not in restaurants. We chose a place that had a huge tree growing inside the restaurant. Let me rephrase that, the restaurant was built around a massive tree. Lol. We ordered a classic local dish called Ćevapčići recommended by the tour guide. It was minced meat made into small sausages with sa kajmakom (with cheese) I was very tasty however I couldn’t finish it as the portions could feed 3 people, it was huge!!

 

Kravice Waterfalls

After leaving Mostar which felt like an oven we headed towards the Kravica Waterfalls to cool off. We had seen pictures of the waterfall on the Viator website, but, nothing prepared us for the beauty of this place. When we arrived the first thing we did was get our phones and cameras out to film, take pictures of what we were seeing. After a couple of tries, we agreed that there were some things you cannot capture but rather you just had to experience it. This is no exaggeration it was that amazing!! I expect to see this kind of tropical beauty in an Amazon rainforest somewhere not Europe, truly stunning!! Kravica looks like a mini Niagara falls surrounded by a large lake. The waterfalls through a series of about 20 falls and 25m and it’s shallow enough to swim in. The water is a little cold at first but once you dive in it is sweet and refreshing.  Lol..

 

 

Thank you for stopping by, don’t leave without saying hello…. look out for my final post on Montenegro.

 

Rx

P.S – Day 1 – Dubrovnik, Croatia

 

 

My Balkan Adventure – Croatia

My Balkan Adventure – Croatia (Day 1)

 Day 2 – Bosnia & Herzegovina 

Currency – Kuna

Hey guys, I’m back from my Balkan adventure. 3 days and 4 nights visiting Croatia, Bosnia, and Montenegro. If I’m honest I need another holiday to get over this one. Lol. I had no plans to travel this year so I had made peace with the idea as this year was solely for building my label, however, I secretly was hoping something would present it self and it did. #Hallelujaaaah. Right so how do you visit 3 countries with activities in between in the space of 3 days? A lot of organising and precise planning. If you’re looking for an adventure or simply want to discover different parts of Europe than the usual popular destinations then I would encourage you to visit these 3 countries earlier rather than later as it’s becoming more popular and a little-crowded every year. Here is my outline of Dubrovnik, Croatia.

 

Croatia – Dubrovnik

Our first stop was Dubrovnik,  known as the ‘Pearl of the Adriatic’, Dubrovnik is the most popular tourist destination in Croatia. It’s hard to resist the orange rooftops reflected in the crystal clear blue waters of the Adriatic Sea. It’s a good location to take advantage of the different day trip options to neighboring countries and the 1100 islands that surround Croatia. Hence why we made it our first stop and our base. The currency in Croatia is Kuna, even in its peak season, it’s still quite an affordable city and also very easy to get around. There’s easy access to transportation buses, taxi, Uber or good old fashion ‘foot’. Lol. The most popular place to visit in Dubrovnik is walking the city walls in the Old Town which is absolutely worth while, it has the best views of the city from the top of the walls. To avoid the crowds and the scorching sun during the summer months, it’s best to arrive early ideally before it opens. I would suggest allowing at least 3 hours to walk the 1.2 miles around the Old Town and take your time to enjoy the stunning views. You would need plenty of water, although they do have a few small shops that sell water along the walk, it can be quiet expensive. To get an even more of a panoramic view of the city there’s also the choice of a  cable car, the best time for this would be just before sunset, so you can watch nature at its best whilst on top of the hills over seeing the whole city. The views of the city and the sun setting is simply breathtaking.

Eat

Mimosa

Great traditional Croatian food and hospitality. From the moment you’re greeted outside the door, to the ambiance and the dining experience was excellent. The best octopus salad!! It was delicious, I’m hungry thinking about it. Lol. We even got a complimentary drink on the house.

Panorama Restaurant and Bar

If you love sea food this would be the best place to experience all that Dubrovnik has to offer in sea food and panorama views of the city, so romantic. To make the most of the experience, set your reservations for dinner to watch the sun’s setting into the evening.

Buffet Škola

Buffet Škola is a fast food Dubrovnik style, think burger and chips but with quality beef and freshly baked sesame seed bun. I especially loved the locally caught sardines marinated cheese. Hmmmmmm yummy!!!There’s also a vegetarian plate available for 80kn.

 

Stay

Valamar Argosy

Valamar Argosy is a family friendly 4-star hotel with a 10-star customer service. Lol. The staff genuinely seemed to really like their jobs. The hotel is set in the lovely picturesque and peaceful town of Babin Kuk peninsula. It has beautifully landscaped gardens. The building’s a newly refurbished and upgraded 4* hotel with stylish rooms, infinity pool, and well-being area. It all set the scene for an ideal relaxing and romantic getaway. It’s also about 15 minutes away from Dubrovnik (Old Town) and has a selection of beaches nearby, you can pick and mix the activities you want to create a bespoke unforgettable Croatian holiday.

Next stop Bosnia and Herzegovina, look out for my post on the beautiful historical city of Mostar (my favourite of all the places we visited ) and Kravica Waterfalls

 

 

Thank you for stopping by, don’t leave without saying hello… Share some stories of your travels any similarities to mine? Look forward to hearing from you.

 

Rx

 

Hitchin Lavender

Hitchin Lavender

 

Londoners what’s happened to the weather? For a moment there we had ‘summer’ oh well, it was good whilst it lasted, however, please please do not discount the British summer just yet not until you’ve been to lavender picking at Hitchin Lavender Farm. Yes, lavender picking!! I escaped the hustle of London and headed to the countryside at the weekend and I’m predicting lavender picking will be as big as when knitting became ‘the cool thing’ to do. You remember about 10 years ago when we were seeing grown men and women knitting on buses, on the tube, anywhere and everywhere.  Basically prior to Saturday, the word lavender brought up images of purple rinse grannies, pot pourri, and retirement homes. I really didn’t expect to like it as much as I did ok let me explain.

 

The Farm

 

Hitchin Lavender is a lavender farm attraction situated between London and Cambridge. It has around 25 miles of lavender rows which you can walk through and pick from. At the price of £5.00, you can wander through purple fields and cut your own lavender bunches. They provide scissors and a brown paper bag to put your bunches in. The colour is spectacular, as well as the fields of lavender, they also grow sunflowers and for £1 each you can cut your own. The farm has some amazing views of rural Hertfordshire and Bedfordshire and there are many interesting walks surrounding it. The fields are in full bloom in June and July,  then in August, the sunflowers come into their own. Inside the 17th century barn, is a range of delicious home made cakes available, you can also browse through the range of products and choose from a large variety of lavender plants on offer.

Style

 

I had never heard of Hitchin Lavender farm, so I googled it to see where we were going and when I saw the purple fields I had a change of mind on the outfit as I saw a great opportunity for a full on photo shoot. Lol. My poor friend had no idea what she had let herself into. Much to my surprise, most people were also there to capture the beautiful rows of purple hues that seemed to go on for miles. I kept my outfit very simple, although it’s a great photo opportunity I had to remind myself that it’s a farm. Making sure my shoes were sensible and also to keep to a neutral palette that compliments the surroundings. So my vintage inspired ASOS jumpsuit was perfect. Wide leg trousers with a cut out back paired with a hat. Although I didn’t wear the hat much it was very useful in storing the lavender I collected.

 

ASOS Jumpsuit – similar

H&M – Hat

 

Do’s / Dont’s

 

Do take a camera/phone camera

Do wear trainers or wedged shoes

Do keep your clothing simple

Avoid strong perfumes, there are a lot of bees and wasps

Avoid high heels

Avoid very short length clothing.

Hitchin Lavender was the perfect day out, ideal for families and tourists wanting to get a taste of the English countryside. I thoroughly enjoyed my day. Visit before the end of the summer,  you’ll be glad you did.

 

 

Thank you for stopping by, it’s always good to hear from you so make a comment, take a look at other posts or make suggestions for future posts.

 

Rx

Share The Word Project

Share The Word Project

 

Hi, Guys!! Welcome to my 3rd post in the inspirational section of my blog, Its a section dedicated to celebrating others. It’s what I love the most about this age of social media, connecting with other creatives, and like minded people.

Today’s inspirational creative is 29-year-old Seb Toussaint, a British-French Street Artist from Normandy France. He’s painted 137 murals in 11 countries, Indonesia, Philippines, Nepal, India, Iraq, Egypt, Ethiopia, Kenya, Colombia, Brazil, and France. He’s a very talented Street Artist and his work is stunning, however, what sets him apart is the context in which he creates his work.  For over 4 years he’s been traveling the slums and refugee camps of the world for his ‘Share The Word’ project. A project where he asks locals to choose words they wish to express painted on the walls of their homes a very simple idea that has had an incredible impact on individuals and many communities. I caught up with Seb and here are 11 questions and answers that best explain what he’s doing.

 

1. Where was your first trip?

 

In 2011 and 2012 I cycled around the world with my 2 best mates. It took a whole year and was a great experience, I learned a lot about the world, and about myself and what I’d be able to do in this world. In 2013 I went to a slum in Jakarta, Indonesia with one of these 2 friends (Spag) to try out an idea we had of asking people to choose a word that’s important to them and painted these words on their house. The project worked well, the locals enjoyed it as much as we did, and that’s how “Share The Word Project” was born.

 

2. What keeps you going back to these communities to install art?

 

Everything about the project is addictive! When you’re working in a slum or a refugee camp for 4 or 5 weeks, you get to know many people, eat with different families, make friends, etc… So I’m surrounded by people while I’m painting on the houses, and they make me feel part of their community very quickly. Being part of a group, feeling part of a family is what makes it difficult to leave these places.
And of course, I like what the project is able to do. As well as making the slum look a little more colourful, it attracts attention to neighbourhoods that no one cares about. And suddenly because of this project, people from the outside of the neighbourhood start coming in to have a look, and journalists write articles about places which they usually ignore. In some places the slums I painted became kind of “cool” and people started coming into the neighbourhood to shoot music videos or fashion photography. The locals felt proud that people from the outside were interacting with them, they felt a little more included in society. It’s only a very small step, it isn’t going to change everyone’s life, but art certainly can make a real positive impact.

 

 

 

 3. Who is your artistic inspiration? (Where do you get your ideas from?) (Who inspires you?)

 

I get my inspiration from a variety of things. I’d say that being curious is the most important thing to stay inspired. I can get ideas of cool patterns by just looking at women’s saris in India, or by visiting mosques in Turkey or Egypt. I can get ideas of colours to use by looking at artwork by Matisse, packets of crisps in Bolivia, or Chinese iced tea bottles.

 

4. Have you ever found yourself in a situation where your life was at stake?

 

Slums aren’t always the safest places to be working in, at least at the beginning. I have been harassed a little in the past, but it’s always happened during the first few days working in a slum. But nothing major has happened, most people in the world are genuinely nice people. Communities have a lot of respect for people who are trying to do something positive in their neighbourhood, so everyone watches out for me. In a few slums like in Kenya or Egypt, I’ve witnessed a lot of violence, but towards me.

 

 

 5. What do your friends and family think about what you do?

 

They are very supportive! They have never told me not to go somewhere because it’s too dangerous or told me to get a “proper job”. I just think they like the idea of the project and the fact that I’m doing what I love the most.

 

6. Which of your works have you found the most rewarding?

It’s hard to pick one, but the huge “PAZ” (peace in Spanish) mural I painted on 16 different houses in Colombia had a great impact. The art caught a lot of attention in local and international media. The president of Colombia talked about the project on his Facebook account, and so did the armed guerilla organisation FARC. The Colombian state and the FARC were in the process of signing a peace treaty to put an end to 50 years of violence, and this huge mural with the word “PEACE” became a symbol that both sides of the conflict identified with. I had no idea that my work would have this sort of impact!

 

 

7. Have you kept in contact with any of the communities you’ve helped?

More and more people worldwide have access to the internet, even in slums. This enables me to stay in contact with people and know what’s going on these places I miss.

 

 

 8. What does a street artist of your kind wear? (on days off)

 

When I’m painting I’m just wearing a simple t-shirt and shorts that are covered in paint. It’s a very boring outfit, to be honest. So when I’m off work, I love wearing suits or combining very formal wear with more casual stuff like jeans with a skinny tie, or a suit with white trainers. I’m a fan of the classic crisp white shirt, I have many and love wearing them with everything from leather jackets, blazers, trench coats… I guess my style is timeless to some extent. People were wearing white shirts with black ties 20 years ago, 50 years ago or even 100 years ago. And people will still be wearing this in the future! I like using a lot of colour when I paint, but strangely I never wear bright colours in my outfits.

 

 

9. Who is your style icon?

 

I love Janelle Monae’s androgynous style! Her outfits can be quite masculine but her swag is so feminine and elegant. David Beckham’s always wears perfect suits, no extravagance, always very well cut. Of course, I like most things by Yves Saint Laurent.

 

10. Do you have any plans of turning your work into other works of art? (coffee table books, prints) (I want a skirt in one of the prints) 🙂

 

I haven’t yet written a book, but it’s only a matter of time before I release one! It will be a great opportunity not only to show pictures of my art but also to tell stories of the people whose words I paint around the world. In the future, I’d love to design fashion. Some of the patterns I paint on walls would look great on fabric!

 11. What word would you choose to paint on your house and why?

 

Maybe I’d choose the word “freedom”. It’s one of the values really worth fighting for. Freedom in society is a fragile thing, there will always be people trying to take away freedom, and there’ll always more freedom to fight for.

 

Thank you for stopping by, catch up with all of Seb’s work, link listed below.

Always wonderful to hear from you so make a comment below.

Rx

 

Twitter – @sebtoussaint

Instagram – @sebtoussaint

Facebook – @sebtoussaint

 

OKAPI x MAXHOSA

OKAPI X MAXHOSA

 

In recent years the continent of Africa has been churning out some amazing luxury brands. From Atelier Loza Maleombho, Orange Culture, Maki Oh, and my very favourite Maxhosa by Laduma whom I had the pleasure of meeting at the Okapi store. You can find most of these brands online, however just like most Fashionistas when it comes to luxury goods I prefer to shop the traditional way.  I want to see and touch the items it’s a whole shopping experience. What if I told you there’s a shop that does exactly that, showcasing only African luxury brands here in London.

Let me introduce you to Okapi, Okapi was first launched in Capetown in 2011 by South African Painter Hanneli Rupert. It’s the home of luxury artisan handbags and accessories made entirely in Africa. The very opposite of fast fashion, the ethos behind Okapi is to craft carefully selected locally sourced materials into unique pieces that can be customised and added to over time. By keeping production local, the brand is able to create job opportunities on the continent and develop its employees. Wouldn’t it be amazing if all brands had the same attitude?

The Okapi ethos of carefully selected craftsmanship has been adopted into a pop-up store this summer in London, showcasing the SS17 collection of South African based luxury brand Maxhosa by Laduma. The collection will be there until August 31st, it’s a well-crafted, beautiful and versatile collection, but don’t take my word for it go and check it out.

OKAPI, 40 Eaton Terrace, SW1W 8TS, London

Thank you for stopping by, hope you get the chance to visit the store and let me know what you think of this post by commenting below.

Kisses,

Rx

 

SS17 - MAXHOSA

SS17 - MAXHOSA

OKAPI - Luxury Handbags

SS17 - MAXHOSA

The Pantry Underwear

The Pantry Underwear

 

Every once in awhile you come across a shop that changes your life, as dramatic as it sounds it’s very true. lol. Ok, picture this, a calm and stylish lingerie shop with all the perks of a boutique, a selection of great brands, established and independent, all under one roof with the prices of a department store. Are you impressed yet? Well, there’s more, with sizes ranging from AA – HH / 28 – 44, they offer fitting services, bridal appointments and ‘Pant Parties’ lol (keep reading I’ll explain ) what more could you ask for?

Eloise Rigby had the vision to create a cool, modern, space a one stop shop for the locals and beyond. The Pantry Underwear can be found on the cobbled street of Camden Passage, it’s about 3 minutes walk from Angel tube station. The original storefront and layout of the shop have been kept to reflect the history of the area, it is often a talking point of the shop. A clean cut cork table displaying lace underwear, Calvin Klein minimalist worthy enough for an Instagram flat lay. The merchandise also includes lesser known British brands that I’d probably not have known about had I not been in the store. Unique, great brands that don’t cost an arm and a leg adding further to the boutique cool factor.

This affordable price point paired with Eloise’s commitment to truly cater for all shapes and sizes are what places her at the top among the bigger more overpriced underwear boutiques. The lack of affordable underwear available on most community high streets is what inspired Eloise to set up The Pantry Underwear.

‘Since opening, I’ve been reminded about just how complicated and daunting underwear shopping can be for women’ explains Eloise. ‘Our fitting service is great and our average bra price is below that of most independent underwear shops, yet we never comprise on quality.’

For Eloise, actions speak louder than words, so when she says she wants to make her mark in the community she means it. ‘We run a ‘Pant Party’ where the guests get complimentary fizz and 10 per cent off in store, and we’ve recently launched Yoga Tuesdays for women in the area’

This is a great shop and Eloise is the loveliest, if you’re in the area or better if you live in the area drop by check out the different brands I promise you won’t be disappointed.

Hope you’ve enjoyed reading up on my discovery. Please look out for a competition on my Instagram page coming up real soon.

 

If you like my post leave a comment and subscribe, thanks for dropping by.

 

Rx

 

 

Entrance into store.

TRIUMPH - Beautiful lace set

LINGADORE - Independent designers.

Bridal Undergarment - Corset and Garter

CALVIN KLIEN - Swimwear

WONDERBRA - White lace

LEPEL - Beautiful lace and ribbon, ideally worn undershirts, suits.

Selfieeee with Eloise x

LFW SS17 – My Off-Schedule experience.

LFW SS17 – My Off-Schedule experience.

 

As your reading this I’m recovering from my weekend of Style, Catwalk, Fashion and more Fashion and what a season it’s been. I had the pleasure of being invited to a few of the shows during the weekend of London Fashion Week and by the final day, I needed naps in-between the shows. to recover lol. I thoroughly enjoyed whizzing around London going from one show to another trying to make it on time, and being ‘fashionably late’.

This is undeniably an exciting time of the year for any fashion lover whether you have access to the shows or simply watching coverage online or reading the newspapers on the different designers showing. It’s a time of year where international editors, buyers, and bloggers land in London for the shows. There’s undoubtedly much excitement to see some of the British design greats and what they’ve decided we’ll be wearing for spring/summer 17. Paul Smith,  Burberry, Vivienne Westwood and many more.

However given London is the most creative, dynamic, energetic of the fashion cities – and undeniably the place for fresh young design talent- why not dedicate a couple of hours to check out some of the off-schedule shows? You’ll discover some of the industry’s newest, most exciting talent and possibly spot the next big thing taking flight.

Here are some major reasons to consider off-schedule shows next season at London Fashion Week.

 

Rocky Star - SS17

1. It gives you a good perspective of the new talent out there, as many of the new designers come from the Middle East, China, Asia, Eastern Europe and Scandinavia, as well as the UK. The off-schedule scene is an international one and has a constant stream of inspirational and creativity from start to finish. This year i saw the collection of Rocky Star from India, FeiFei Cicada from China, Ashley Isham from Singapore, Apu Jan from Taiwan and Han Wen from Parsons School of Design in New York.

Apu Jan - SS17

2. Fashion Scout is known for hosting and nurturing the most exciting designers from around the globe. Recent big names from its shows have been Peter Pilotto, Felder Felder, David Koma, Eudon Choi and Agi & Sam to pick just a few, which means its more than likely you’ll see the early the making of a huge design star.

Han Wen - Merit Award winner 2016

3. Ones to Watch is my favourite as its one of the most exciting shows on the off-schedule line up along with the Merit award, which Han Wen won this year. It provides new designers with a fantastic opportunity to get their business off the ground via financial and expert business support every season. For me, Ones to Watch has always been one of the best off-schedule shows, and the collections themselves are full of unique ideas. It’s also nice to support new design talent.

Ashley Isham - SS17

4. If you’re looking for something avant-garde and fun - and certainly less commercial then the off-schedule is where it’s at. In the times I’ve been attending, I’ve seen some truly memorable shows. Pam Hogg is a favourite of mine, she embodies the punk spirit in her designs and in her shows, always very exciting and creative.

Fei Fei Cicada - SS17 at the V&A

5. The vibe is generally a little more relaxed. Whether you’re a blogger, editor, stylist, or even recent fashion graduate, if you’ve managed to get a ticket it’s pretty likely you’ll get in, unlike the on-schedule shows where the standing queue doesn’t get a look in. It is a little more crowded and hot, but it’s also a great taster for London Fashion Week if you haven’t been able to get some of the bigger show tickets.

Catwalk Show

Backstage at the V&A

After the catwalk show - models pose next to the statues in the V&A

 

 

Thank you for stopping by I hope you’ve enjoyed my tips on the off-schedule shows, let me know what you think and comment below.

 

Rx

 

Roma ti amo

Roma ti amo

 

Hello! Buongiorno! I’m back from from my 3 nights 4 days trip to Rome and it’s all I talk about. I enjoyed it so much that at times having to stop to capture the moment got in the way. I can’t believe it’s just 2 hours away from London. Being in Rome gave me the chance to reflect on how I use my time. I thought of countless times I had wasted 2 whole hours, lazing about, on the phone, trying new hairstyles just doing mindless things. All that time i could’ve been on my way to Rome. Lol.

Sounds like a bit of an exaggeration but I thought about taking the steps towards making the right choices in my life so I can use my time well. (will be doing a post on that) Nonetheless you would be right in saying I’ve become a little obsessed with Rome. Everything from the cobbled narrow streets, the people, the weather, and yes, the food. The food was so good that each time I planned on taking photographs of it I would remember when my plate was finished. I looked through all my photos and to my amazement I did not have any photo evidence of the food. I always thought Paris was my favourite city in Europe, but Rome, Roma has opened up a whole new world a new fantastic point of view, no one to tell us no…errm oops yes I can’t wait to go back to Italy to explore some more. Please find my recommendations below on where to stay, eat and shop.

 

Eat

Tiberino (neo – traditional Roman food),

Ginger (vegetarian), Pinsere,

Ciao Checca (slow fast food)

Ai Tre Scalini (tapas/wine bar)

La Quercia (neo – traditional Roman food)

Bir N Fud – (Bar/ restaurant) (the name of this place had me in stitches)

These are the few places we ate at; my best advice is to ask locals and avoid the tourist areas with deals.

 

Drink (Coffee)

I’m not a coffee drinker however I have now developed a habit..oops

La Cassa Del Tazza,

Antico Caffe Greco,

San ‘Eustachio

It’s hard to get a bad coffee in Rome, I recommend the iced espresso, hmmmm delicious.

 

Do

Rome is full of incredible historical monuments (several of which are included in this post ) but beyond those, wandering was my favourite thing to do; the Jewish quarter is was very pretty.

 

Stay

Airbnb – Giulia’s Nest situated in the heart of Rome (Trastevere) walking distance to most of the historical monuments. A cute 2 bed flat, the perfect little flat for a long weekend.

 

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