My Balkan Adventure – Montenegro

 

My Balkan Adventure – Montenegro (Day 3)

 Day 1 – Dubrovnik Croatia

 Day 2 – Bosnia&Herzegovina 

 

By day 3 the early morning rises had taken its toll on us and as the alarm went off for the 2nd time at 5:45am we wondered who’s brilliant idea it was to visit Montenegro. Nevertheless we were up and ready by 7am for our tour with Viator.  We started off from Dubrovnik, Croatia along the coastline been guided by the same tour guide we had for Bosnia. The drive from Dubrovnik into Montenegro shows the beautiful coastline as it gradually and dramatically changes. Almost as a reward for the long trip the scenery opened up into a grand mountainous sight with the town Perast nestled in the middle.

 

 

Perast

Perast has only one main street, its a tiny town with 16 churches, and 17 grand palazzos a reflection of its Venetian past. Many of these buildings are now ruins and some are being renovated. Perast has an air of ‘posh’ waterfront town, yet with the friendliness and familiarity of a fishing village. There are a clutter of uniformed stone buildings stacked on the foothill of Mount St. Elijah with sea view cafes looking out onto piers with small fishing boats floating on crystal clear waters. However the main attraction in Perast is not even on land, they’re two picturesque slightly surreal islands in the middle of the bay. One of the island is a monastery with tall evergreens surrounding it and the other is man-made with a Catholic Church with a perculiar history. The story is that in 1452 an icon of the Virgin Mary was found by two fishermen on a reef that above water. Over the centuries, people visited that reef and dropped stones into the water where the icon had appeared. The popularity of this ritual grew to the point that ships were loaded with rocks and sunk into the sea on the very spot. All of those stones, rocks and ships created an the island. After about 45 minutes at Perast we drove about 30 minutes further and came to Kotor.

 

Kotor – City Walls

The city walls of Kotor dates back to medieval times. It was started in 9th century to protect Kotor from invaders, and was added to by whoever ran the city at the time. From the Byzantines to the Venetians, until the 15th century when they finally formed a full loop up into the hillside. The maze like medieval town is well preserved, in the daytime the churches, museums, the squares and Venetian palaces appear greyish – green colour of the mountains it can be hard to pick them out. Making it very easy to get lost as they sometimes appear the same. We started our walk from the Kotor’s North Gate and followed the cobbled steps up. The further up we went the path became narrower and very difficult to walk, however the views were spectacular. We were told there are 1400ish steps and the fortress at the top was 1200 metres and with the glare of the sun and 30 minutes to spare before we meet our tour guide we decided to stop where we were, take photographs and make our way down. If you’re going to do the city walls in Montenegro it’s essential that you have the correct footwear, preferably hiking shoes or trainers (sneakers) with a grip. The cobbled ground is very very slippery and dangerous to walk on.

 

Views of the bay of Kotor from half way from the city walls

 

Eat

Konoba Potun   Great seafood menu – locally sourced

Tanjga –  Grilled meat and vegetables (similar to Čevapčiči)

 

 

Thank you for stopping by, don’t leave without saying hello… Share some stories of your travels any similarities to mine? Look forward to hearing from you.

 

Rx